Advantages of Dental Implants

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]The least costly and most commonly used method by dentists to restore a patient’s dentition is the removable denture. The downside of the removable denture is the inconvenience of daily removal and maintenance. Dental implants on the contrary are securely anchored to your jaw bone. The dental implant itself is made of Titanium, a very strong, corrosion-resistant, natural element that is perfectly biocompatible with bone. The implant is placed within the upper and/or lower jaw to act as a direct or indirect anchor for the replacement teeth.

Natural Looking. Teeth replaced with dental implants offer a more natural look and feel for the patient. As the implant fuses with the bone in the jaw and the prosthesis is securely anchored. Dental Implants provides a nateral looking solution for replacing missing teeth.

No Movement. Due to this enhanced anchorage offered of the dental implants, a solution that cannot be attained from a removable prosthesis (no need for messy adhesives). With dental implants, a person can feel secure that their teeth will not move.

Comfort. Because your implant supported replacement teeth are not resting directly on the tissue of your mouth, you don’t develop uncomfortable sore spots. On the other hand, removable dentures can cause inflammation of the mouth tissues that are under the denture itself, primarily if not removed every night when sleeping and if not cleaned on a daily basis.

Stimulation of bone growth: Keeping your teeth helps to preserve your jaw bones. Once a tooth is lost, one of the major problems that face dentists that treat edentulous patients is the continuing loss of jaw bone. The result of all this bone loss over time is that removable dentures start fitting less and less well. As the tissue under the denture starts to shrink and pull away from the underside of the denture, it leaves less and less support underneath the removable prosthesis. This is when all the problems associated with an ill-fitting denture start to show. One of the most fascinating and important properties of titanium, the material from which dental implants are made, is that it attracts the growth of bone cells.

Chewing Function: Due to the lack of permanent anchorage, removable dentures can move or slip while eating, therefore making eating a difficult and less than desirable task. The ability to chew foods improves dramatically with dental implants.

Taste Sensation: A complete upper removable denture covers the entire roof of the mouth. Your tongue and the roof of your mouth are covered with thousands of tiny taste buds. Once the roof of the mouth is covered with the removable denture, food becomes less easy to taste, more difficult to sample and enjoy. With an implant-supported prosthesis, the roof of the mouth is not covered and food can be tasted by all the taste receptors in the mouth.

Phonetics. Removable dentures can slip and slide around in the mouth. A complete, upper denture, and some designs of upper partial dentures, cover the roof of the mouth. Both can result in interference with the normal phonetic movements of the tongue, causing difficulty in normal speech.

Nutritional uptake by digestive system. Digestion begins in the mouth. Teeth subject food to the mechanical process of grinding, breaking it down into smaller and smaller pieces. Almost simultaneous with the smelling and chewing of food, saliva secretes onto and mixes with it. The enzymes in the saliva begin the further digestive breakdown of food. Now, if the step of mastication (grinding) of food were to be reduced due to inefficiency of a removable denture, the digestive process would be altered and food would not get properly digested further along the digestive tract.

Nutritional balance is further indirectly enhanced by the stability of an implant-supported prosthesis. As one is more confident to enjoy a varied and healthy diet, and you are not restricted to what you can eat due to unstable removable dentures.

Misplacing or loss of the prosthesis. Removable dentures can easily be misplaced and lost. There are ample stories of domestic pets ‘eating’ the patients prosthesis (dogs and cats are attracted to the saliva that coats the prosthesis. However, with a fixed, implant-supported prosthesis , your likelihood of loss is next to nil.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

A Tip for the Sweet Tooth

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Everyone knows that sweets are bad for your teeth. But, did you know that the amount of sweet food you eat is not as important as the length of time your teeth are exposed to sweets? Eat sweets at mealtime rather than between meals. The amount of saliva produced at that time will help protect your teeth.

If you cannot avoid sweets between meals, choose something with less sugar like nuts and seeds, peanut butter, popcorn, plain yogurt. Sticky sweets that stay in your mouth for longer periods of time like toffee or hard candies should be avoided as snacks.

Vitamins, Minerals and Your Teeth
Just like our bodies, our teeth and gums need certain essential vitamins and minerals to stay healthy and strong. Babies, children and adults all need ample amounts of the minerals calcium and phosphorous, and the vitamins A, C and D to ensure proper tooth development and strength.

Calcium, aided by phosphorous and vitamin D, is the main component of teeth and bones. It’s what helps keep them strong. Vitamin A is necessary for the formation of tooth enamel, and vitamin C is essential for healthy gums.

Nursing mothers should keep in mind that their diet may influence the growth of the newly-forming teeth of their baby. A nursing mother’s diet should include foods from all of the food groups.

An adequate intake of the proper vitamins and minerals helps in the development of healthy teeth. A lack or absence of these minerals can lead to disease.

Fluoride is an important mineral for tooth decay prevention. Fluoride strengthens the enamel of young developing teeth, and acts with calcium and phosphorous to restore and harden enamel in mature teeth. Fortunately for our teeth, fluoride has been added to almost half of the drinking water in Canada. If your drinking water comes from a well, you may want to have your water tested for the presence of natural fluoride. Contact your local health unit for more information.

As with the overall health of our body, a good diet is the best way to ensure dental nutrition. Strong teeth need a variety of whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables and lean meats, in addition to milk products. Toothhealthy snacks also include nuts and seeds, peanut butter, cheese, plain yogurt and popcorn.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Allergy to Latex

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Latex allergy is a hypersensitivity to the naturally occurring protein found in rubber which may cause symptoms to arise. These symptoms may be as mild as skin irritations (contact dermatitis), hives, itchy eyes, runny nose, to more severe occurrences such as asthma and life-threatening anaphylaxis.

The symptoms and signs associated with anaphylaxis include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Wheezing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Rapid or weak pulse
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Shock
  • Respiratory failure
  • Circulatory failure

Many medical and dental supplies contain latex, including gloves, blood pressure cuffs, urinary catheters, dental dams and material used to fill root canals, as well as tourniquets and equipment for resuscitation. The tendency to develop allergies to latex appears to be an inherited trait, and as with other allergies, the more intense and frequent the exposure to latex, the more likely one is to develop an allergy to it. Healthcare workers have a greater chance (up to 10%) to develop a latex allergy due to their repeated exposure to rubber based products. However, in recent years, there has been a move to decrease the addition of powder in these gloves (powder was used to ease the ability to put on the gloves and decrease perspiration of the hands within the latex gloves), and this appears to have decreased the occurrence amongst healthcare professionals of latex allergies.

Other groups at risk include those who have had various surgeries, especially those involving the nervous system and genitourinary tract system. Children with spina bifida also appear to have a higher occurrence of developing latex allergies.

If you have a known sensitivity or allergy to latex or any related items, please notify our office. Non-latex substitutes can be found for all of the latex-containing items that are normally used.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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